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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
what's happening there reminds him of katrina. gary, tell me why you believe that. >> reporter: piers, this is a city of 50,000 people right across the hudson river in new york city. yes, it does remind me of hurricane katrina because behind us, we have 50% of hoboken flooded and there are, according to the mayor, thousands of people in their apartments and homes who can't get out right now. so we actually went on a front loader with the mayor, they're using front loaders who rescue people. what's different about this than new orleans, what we saw in katrina in 2005 when we went down streets in boats, there are no casualties. that's the good news. but they're still not 100% sure. people can't leave their homes, not only because the water's deep but because there's live power lines in the water. so as we're going down the street in the front loader we see people waving from the windows, children, men, women, and most of them seem to have smiles on their faces because they have seen the water recede. in new orleans the water kept getting higher. this water is receding but people are wai
in a time of disaster. quite different from now democrats treated president bush after katrina. this from james. fitting it tacks an act of god to finally spotlight romney's weaknesses. thank you for your responses and joining me today. "cnn newsroom" continues right now with ashleigh banfield. >> thank you so much. it's 11:00 on the east coast. 8:00 a.m. on the west coast. recovery is a word you are going to be hearing a lot of in the next few days. the word normalcy, not so much. in the wake of superstorm sandy, normal life is a far off dream for so many millions in the northeast corridor and points west. worst of all, a still growing toll of lives lost. at least 40 in the u.s. one so far in canada. more than 6 million homes and businesses still don't have electricity but that is a big improvement from yesterday. and while floods and surges with some exceptions have gone down, that just makes the devastation all the more apparent. you are looking at point pleasant beach halfway between new york and atlantic city on the new jersey shore. president obama visiting these scenes this afterno
it before. went through the tornados, 9/11, katrina, the weather stories of the past two years have been incredible. i think you will see again in the aftermauth of the storm, so often the worst of mother nature tend to bring out the best in humanity and think we will see >>> this morning on "world news now" -- after the perfect storm. >> with a mixture of determination and disbelief, millions of people reeling from hurricane sandy are taking th i very long recovery. realizing what has been lost and changed forever. >> we will rebuild it. no questionen my mind. we will rebuild it. but for those of us who are my age it went beep the same. >> the numbers are staggering. but they only begin to tell the story. at lea 50 dead, more than 8 million without power, tens of billions of dollars in damage. and the resilient people of new york city are once again forced to find a way to cope. >> and we saw the river coming toward us. and it, it actually looked like -- something out of a -- a movie. it was -- it was unbelievable. >> later today, president obama will visit parts of new jersey that bore
katrina. >> yeah, that's one of the problems. >> governor christy said you couldn't even call it a levy. it's just a berm holding back the water, like the bank of a river, and it was breached into it is flooding these three towns with four or five feet of water, so that is not good, but we are taking your calls this morning at 1-800-steph-1-2. going to be talking about hurricane sandy, and the political ramifications of everything going on on the east coast. whether obama is doing a good job handling the situation, governor christy, the mayors of new york and all of those towns, and yeah just getting your thoughts on what is going on on the east coast. so we'll be taking a break here. give us a call 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. this is the "stephanie miller show," with chris, jim, and jacki. >> on the "stephanie miller show" "stephanie miller show" radio show in suburban america this morning -- >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll
reinforce or under d undermine that narrative. in the case of george w. bush in 2006 with hurricane katrina, he campaigned as basically a compassionate conservative. but his actions during the whole katrina mess proved that he was otherwise. >> because you have that lasting image of president bush and when he said that thing about his fema director, way to go, brownie, or whatever he said. that sticks in people's minds to this day. >> right. that would be a defining sound bite of his entire presidency. granted, it's unfair, but that's what sticks in people's minds. >> in your mind, has president obama made the right move, wrong move? what do you think? >> i think he has made the appropriate move here. he hasn't been too over. that's the key here. you can't be overtly political in how you respond to these kinds of disasters. he obviously will accrue some benefits because he's acting aas commanders in chief are supposed to act and help people on a broad basis. as the remarks of governor christie of new jersey proved, this is a -- he gets bipartisan support out of this disaster. that has to he
everything that everybody else did getting ready for it. i was -- i sat through katrina when katrina happened. so i have kind been through a little bit of this before. but this is -- what happened here the skop scope of it. i don't think we know the scope. >> the magnitude is greater than anyone has grasped yet. >> this is where we need our news media to come in. if i may we need fewer reporters standing in waist-high water seeing they are going to be blown over and more real reporting, real news. what's going on. >> i have heard that criticism. i don't agree and i will tell you why. when i see someone standing in atlantic city in the middle of a boardwalk actually in water and i agree with him. anyone man enough that thinks they should be going out for a stroll, walking a dog and looks at that and saysly stay in. >> i was looking ate and watching ali being blown around in new york city. my first thought was why is cnn trying to kill ali velshi? what did he do here? >> ali -- >> for the 2008 crash coverage. >> it is a dramatic image that fully tells the story of how big this is and how danger
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
category 1 fool you. center terms of pressure. cat 3. same size as katrina. size of it cloud to cloud, hard to escape its grip for most of the country. just an amazing system. ÑsÑs how far will people go to relieve their sore throat? try these. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. not just a sensation, sensational relief. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- after the perfect storm. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- after the perfect storm. >> for more than 8 million people struggling in the cold and dark, life as they know it is turned upside down, but they will recover. for at least 50 people, hurricane sandy proved deadly. >> that nature is more powerful than we are. >> after a devastating blow from nature, new york city is already on the rebound. its mass transit and airports, it stores and stock exchanges coming back to life. its neighbor, new jersey, still in deep pain. >> i have met some folks there that obviously now have no place to live at the moment, and are extraordinarily emotional. a
just a few moments ago that this is similar to what we saw during katrina. >> that's right. hard to grasp. >> homes on fire. >> and then you've got homes on fire. you saw it in new orleans with katrina. these just spontaneous explosions involving homes. and unfortunately, you've got all this water, and firefighters and first responders can't get that water -- >> yeah. to use it to put -- >> to put on the fire. it's a dangerous situation for them. and this is exactly what the mayor was trying to warn people about. don't put your first responders in danger. but this is the situation here. we're going to have much more of our continuing coverage of this superstorm. next. cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? 100% new. 100% mmm... wow, that is mmm... it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calori
. while we are going down the streets, it reminded me of what we experienced in 2005 with katrina. fortunately in this city, no one has died. there are no confirmed injuries. that is the good news. but it certainly looked like new orleans. what also looked like new orleans, when you looked in the windows. what we saw in the windows were children, mothers and fathers, waving at us, in most cases smiling. people on balconies waving at us. why were they smiling? what they've seen is the water receding. that's the good news, it's gone down from yesterday. the reason they can't get out of their homes is because the water not only is four or five feet deep, but there are also believed to be live power lines in the water. so it could be fatal to walk outside your house. spirits seem good but it was sure strange to see people in their windows, stuck in their homes with no power whatsoever, no heat and in some cases not a lot of food or water. we also saw people who seemed a little disoriented and confused and were trying to get out of their homes. in one case i saw two people trying to dr
's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. but what about your wrinkles? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair visibly reduces fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. why wait if you don't have to. neutrogena®. [ male annou
, in hurricane katrina in 2005, the team of the nypd used a helicopter to lift people who were stranded in their homes by flood water. down on staten island three people now are missing. we know that 14 people have lost their lives on staten island alone at least 54 across the area so far. as we are seeing at ground level and especially from the air, perhaps the worst physical destruction is along the jersey shore. no doubt about that. today as you saw at the top of the broadcast, president obama and new jersey governor chris christie. >> crisis makes unexpected bed fellows. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his concern and compassion for the people of our state. >> president obama returned the fair. favor. >> he has put his heart and soul in making sure that the people of new jersey bounce back better than before. >> obama and christie touring a shelter for residents who lost everything. >>. [ inaudible ] >> fema will be coordinating. >> and walking a neighborhood among the hardest hit. >> among the surprises a president not known for displaying affection showed it this day. >
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
spiriva. sxwrirchlgts we talk about katrina. there is the long island express as well that was hit in the middle east. it claimed hundreds and hundreds of lives. the death toll was so high. there was hardly any warning or preparation for that matter. well, in the wake of this week's superstorm time magazine is exploring ways to protect people and property from these monster hurricanes. brian joins us live from new york. brooen, it's great to see you. first of all, very compelling articles here. i want to start off by talking about the power grid. you've got millions of folks along the east coast still without power. now they are freezing. we're going to talk about the real cold temperatures coming up over the weekend. how do we focus on the power system to make it more resilient, stronger? >> well, one thing you can do is to look actually at buried power lines. 18% of distribution lines in the u.s. are actually underground. of course, if they're above ground, then they're vulnerable to being knocked down by trees, which is what's happened in all kinds of storms, including a big one
died from hurricane katrina are from heart conditions. this is a time to join together with your neighbors. >> let's talk more about what foods are safe to eat. you will be surprised with some of these. thank you so much. >> it is 56 after the hour. our team coverage of the monster storm continues at the top of the hour including a look at the snow after sandi. we are live up and down the east coast all of the latest to keep you and your family safe. stay with us.
to colonel owen of the army corps of engineers who was in new orleans after hurricane katrina, and he said that new york city is a much more complex problem because these tunnels are so deep and they are so long. and the path tunnel may be even luckier, if you will, than the subway tunnels because the subway tunnels, the system that just had its 108th birthday on saturday, one day before hurricane sandy hit. some of the electrical equipment in the tunnel -- some are so old they don't know what is the affect of salt water eroding the tunnels. one thing that struck me is that governor cuomo was talking quite firmly yesterday and today about climate change and how climate change has made lower manhattan much more vulnerable to these storm surges and has made the subway system vulnerable, which is unfortunately something that what was predicted and predictable. >> well, it's also something -- i was talking to a climate change expert today. it is only going to get worse. we have seen the water rise a foot over the last 100 years but the next 100 years should be rising in an area of two three fe
hurricane katrina days, used to run fema when katrina happened. he said this about what the president is doing. my guess is that he wants to gt ahead of it, he doesn't want to be accused of not getting on top of it, paying attention to it or playing politics in the middle of it. he went on to say thabout benghazi. what do you make of this? >> it's interesting coming from someone who has an abysmal record on handling emergencies. where i'm from, my family was evacuated, are happy that the president jumped in and moved quickly in response to this storm. we don't take too much credence from somebody with a record like mr. brown. >> thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> interesting question to have about fema. reporters throwing questions at governor romney yesterday. they were asking him a number of times -- he wouldn't state -- do you think this is problematic for the governor? >> i don't think so at all. first of all, let me just respond to jen. she just blew off the criticism about benghazi. you listen to her saying in a crisis the president hunkered down in the white house, gett
. and if you don't, there's a disaster. let's just look at what happened at hurricane katrina. >> yeah. >> let's look at what happened to hurricane katrina. you know what, though? again this is part of a bigger problem with mitt romney right now and republicans and democrats that are afraid to talk about how you really save this country and tackle the debt. instead, they talked about silly things like cutting fema, cutting big bird or saying we're going to take care of all of our problems by raising some taxes on rich people. instead of talking about saving this country for the next generation. >> and also not being honest about defense. >> and both sides not being honest about defense. >> okay. thank you. >> how's that? >> good. >> i don't define fema as quote big government. >> right. >> i define entitlement programs by their numbers that are going to cripple us as, quote, big government. >> "wall street journal," barack obama -- when the history of this administration is written, maybe someone will note the difference. here is that man who promised a transformative presidency, and it amount
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
from a katrina, from 9/11 and this happens and it reinforces. guess what, where were those people on 9/11 they were at the tip of manhattan and the same area that's getting hit so hard right now. there are other areas, i came into cbs this morning somebody said i'm up in rockland county, nobody's telling that story. nasa county out on the island, there are places our cameras aren't getting to. so the devastation. >> rose: because there are so many stories. >> that's right. >> rose: thank you very much. back in moment. stay with us. >> rose: al -- al -- al has not poire -- the government is due to change before the year is out with enrique pena becoming president in december. but the challenges facing the country remain the war on the drug cartels in relation with the united states will remain key areas of focus. i'm pleased to have alejandro poir at this table. welcome. >> thank you very much charlie. >> rose: i interviewed calderon, the president for another month i guess, month and-a-half here when he was in town for the clinton global initiative. i raised these questions wit
an unnerving news conference a short while ago. during which he issued a katrina-like warning to the thousand of people in the state who he estimates are -- are marooned in their homes with no way, no way of getting out tonight. he issued a stark warning. no way the government can come rescue themmen the m ethem -- ao dan harris. next up, dramatic high stakes evacuation. one of new york state's biggest hospitals, forced to move their patients -- even, during the chaos. >>> we . >>> thank you for joining us. the floodwaters of tonight's super storm are receding, but there is no doubt it has crippled new york city. officials tell abc news that new york may be without power for several days. and that the flooded subway system will be out of service until well after the power is restored. we want to take you back to the drama unfolding in the nyu hospital in manhattan where the effects of the power outage were felt acutely when backup generators failed. the hospital was forced to evacuate their patients including 20 infants from the neo natal intensive care unit. we are joined now by our new york
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)

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